Antioxidant Herbal Teas

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white cup of tea.jpgIf you adore brewing, enjoying the aroma and sipping hot herbal teas, please, prepare to be excited about the antioxidant along with other benefits  in some of your new and favorite herbal teas.

Herbal teas can be used as a substitute for coffee, energy drinks and sodas and are very healthy.  They offer a number of health benefits and most are calorie free.  Make your teas with electrolyzed kangen® water and enjoy added antioxidant benefits.

So…let’s begin and explore a few  antioxidant herbal teas.

Turmeric root tea

This herb has been acknowledged for centuries as a natural healer in the east. It has been studied  and researched more than any other herb because of its medicinal effects. 

Read more information on  Kangen Ukon Tumeric on my website and be sure to checkout the videos there… they will show you why Ukon is far more than just Tumeric!

Click here for more information about turmeric.

There are thousands of medical studies done on turmeric.  Click here for pub med independent research. Type turmeric into the search line.  This is a powerful herb.

Alternative Medicine suggest that turmeric – or, more specifically, the primary polyphenol of turmeric (called curcumin) has anticancer properties.

We all know someone who is suffering from the ravages of cancer.  Click here to see what the American Cancer Society has to say about turmeric.  Drink two or three cups through out the day to keep your cells bathed in curcumin, the active ingredient in this herb.

Recap of turmeric root

Properties:

  • Antibacterial
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Antioxidant

Benefits and supports:

  • The liver
  • Circulatory system.
  • Showing promise to prevent and treat Alzheimer’s.
  • More than (700) citations on the internet alone on curcumin and how it effects cancer

 

Fennel seed  tea

Yes another spice we cook with.  When you think fennel seed tea, think all things digestion. This tea helps  your digestion.  One of the most endearing properties of fennel is its carminative.  This means it prevents the formation of gas  and aids in the quick  expulsion of gas from the gastrointestinal tract.  It is a traditional digestive aid  for heartburn and stomach aches in general.  It has also been used to treat irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms.  If this is not enough the seeds are rich in iron, potassium, selenium and vitamins.  Make this tea with hot electrolyzed water and let it steep for 2-3 minutes.  Relax  and enjoy!

Recap Fennel seed tea

Properties:

  • Anti-spasmodic
  • Anti-microbial
  • Anti-bacterial
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Vitamin rich

Benefits and supports

  •  Digestive system

 

Holy Basil Tea

A traditional herb in Ayurveda medicine.  This tea is called an adaptogen.  Adaptogens adapt to serve the body where it is needed most.  This tea also called Tulsi meaning it is also characterized as a stress reliever.  If you are under stress this is the tea for you.  Click here to see what Dr. Weil has to say about holy basil.

 

Recap of Holy basil tea

Properties

  • Adaptogen (anti-stress)
  • Antibacterial
  • Anti-fungal
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Antioxidant

 

Benefits and supports:

  •  Memory booster
  • Fever reduction
  • Cough soothing
  • Sore throat relief
  • Soothing to bites, cuts, and scrapes
  • Headache treatment
  • Increased kidney function
  • Balanced emotional health
  • Clear acne
  • Possible blood sugar regulation
  • Stress reliever

 

Hibiscus tea  china cup of tea jpg

 

Being from the south I have for many years enjoyed plucking the hibiscus flower and sucking the sweet nectar at the end of the flower.  Many years later I visited St. Thomas US VI and delight in seeing the iguana devour the flower.

Hibiscus has been used by the indigenous people of Africa, Asia and the Caribbean regions to help promote general wellness.

Experts think flavonoids which dilate blood vessels is responsible for the reduction in blood pressure. Drink (3) cups a day for (6) weeks to achieve this benefit.   More research is needed to determine if this is a sustainable and viable option to use in place of medication.  (Do not discontinue your medication for hypertension without your doctors direction).

Drink hibiscus tea for constipation and use as a gentle laxative.  Keeping the bowels moving well is essential to good health.  Can be used as a natural diuretic and restore proper water levels in the body.

Hibiscus tea contains an enzyme inhibitor that lowers the production of amylase, an enzyme that breaks down sugar and starches. With less amylase, a person typically is not as able to absorb as many carbohydrates. That means a person’s body can’t use or store all the carbohydrates he eats, possibly making it easier to hit a weight loss goal or avoid gaining too many pounds.

 

Recap Hibiscus tea

 Properties:

  •  Antioxidant
  • Vitamin C

Benefits and supports:

  • Reduce Blood pressure
  • Dilate blood vessels
  • Increase energy and stamina
  • Promote vitality
  • Relieve constipation
  •  Mild natural diuretic
  • Weight Loss and Management
  • Support healthy cholesterol
  • Supports how the body uses blood sugar

 

Nettle leaf tea

Nettle is beneficial as a spring tonic because it supports the respiratory tract and bronchial airways for those with allergies.  This tea has a long history going back centuries.   Nettle tea fights coughs and loosen congestion.  More studies are needed to confirm nettle’s antihistamine properties.   If you have allergies or chest congestion try this tea.  Nettle tea can also be of great help to those who suffer from diabetes, because it leads to the decrease of blood sugar.

Stinging nettle root is used widely in Europe to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).  Studies in people suggest that stinging nettle, together especially saw palmetto, may be effective at relieving symptoms, such as reduced urinary flow, the feeling of incomplete emptying of the bladder and a persistent urge to urinate. These symptoms are caused by the enlarged prostate gland pressing on the urethra (the tube that empties urine from the bladder.  Please work with your doctor for a proper diagnosis and to rule out other diseases.

Click here to read what WebMD has to say about stinging nettle.

Recap Nettle leaf tea

Benefits and supports:

  • Decrease blood sugar
  • Supports urinary tract
  • Has been used to treat early  (BPH) benign prostatic hyperplasia.
  • Treat joint pain
  •  Hay fever
  • Supports immune system
  • Eczema
  • Arthritis
  • Gout

 

Dandelion Root tea

I have sipped delicious dandelion wine, so why not dandelion tea.  The roots of this sometime bothersome perennial or some call a weed has been used in traditional herbal medicine for hundreds of years.  Native Americans boiled the plant and used it to treat kidney disease, and stomach ailments.

 

According to Dr Oz’s Blog dandelion is a natural diuretic that removes excess toxins and water from your body, which purifies the blood. By purifying the blood, your liver has to do less work.  The liver is the organ that breaks down the majority of medications we take and it removes metabolites from alcohol and fatty foods.  As a diuretic, dandelion rouses you to urinate more. this lowers the blood pressure naturally.  Dandelion root was one of Dr. Oz’s herbs of the month.

Dandelion is also great for diabetics because it helps the body to produce insulin and control blood sugar. It also plays a role in bone health as a great source of calcium.  The next time you see that lovely yellow flower/weed pop up, pull it up and chew it up.

Recap dandelion tea

Properties:

  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin D
  • Minerals-potassium, iron and zinc

Benefits and supports:

  • Diabetes
  • Bone health
  • Kidney
  • Stomach ailments
  • Supports the gallbladder
  • Acne
  • Treat Cancer

In Ayurveda medicine, Chinese and Native American medicine, herbs has been used for hundreds of years. However, it is just in recent years herbs begun gaining popularity in the West.

 

Scientific research is ongoing for some herbs however, case after case of anecdotal evidence and hundreds of years of use cannot be wrong.

 

These many properties alone can account for countless potential benefits including increased sense of well-being, increased immune function, and disease prevention.  Why not add herbal tea to your natural health regime.

 

Find a way to incorporate therapeutic plants into your diet.  Make yourself a cup of hot tea  with Kangen® water, let it steep for a few minutes, take a deep breath, sip and think good thoughts.

 

Honor Yourself!

 

 

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8 Comments

  1. i love herbal teas and the information you provided was most beneficial. I am determined to drink more turmeric tea daily. During the summer months I drink hibiscus tea as a cool and delicious punch.

    March 31, 2015
    Reply
    • Harriette Harriette said:

      Eleanora, you are further ahead than most. I am so pleased you found the information helpful. Thank you and by all means try different
      herbal teas.
      To your health.
      Love, tolerance and peace,
      Harriette

      March 31, 2015
      Reply
  2. RM said:

    Lots of good info and good links for further research.

    April 3, 2015
    Reply
    • Harriette Harriette said:

      Ronica, thank you very much. I am pleased you got good information from the article.
      It is important to take time to get more data and educate yourself more on herbal teas.

      Love, tolerance and peace,
      Harriette

      April 4, 2015
      Reply
  3. RM said:

    I’m going to pick up some tea soon to add to my 10 day detox. Organic herbsl teas are allowed and I’m glad to know which ones will benefit me the most.

    April 4, 2015
    Reply
    • Harriette Harriette said:

      Ronica, thank you for your comment about your 10 day detox. Adding herbal teas is a splendid idea. I will be mindful of it in the future.

      Love, tolerance and peace,
      Harriette Blye

      April 4, 2015
      Reply
  4. Renee said:

    I have been enjoying my daughter’s loose tea collection while she is away at college, especially the herbal and green selections. Mmm mmm good! This post with all your helpful fun facts encourages me to keep on sipping. ;0)

    April 4, 2015
    Reply
    • Harriette Harriette said:

      Renee, Since I have been exploring the many varieties of tea, a new world has open to me.
      You and I shall continue sipping and enjoying the benefits.

      Love, tolerance and peace,
      Harriette Blye

      April 5, 2015
      Reply

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